Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

Blue Lily, Lily Blue, by Maggie Stiefvater (Raven Cycle #3) | an underwhelming third installment but still fairly enjoyable

17378508Blue Sargent has found things. For the first time in her life, she has friends she can trust, a group to which she can belong. The Raven Boys have taken her in as one of their own. Their problems have become hers, and her problems have become theirs.

The trick with found things, though, is how easily they can be lost.

Friends can betray.
Mothers can disappear.
Visions can mislead.
Certainties can unravel.

I had fairly high expectations for this installment because I liked the other two so much, and while I did enjoy this one, it wasn’t as great as I wanted it to be. This book is certainly slower and deeper plot-wise, the characters are getting closer and closer to finding Glendower and even more secrets about themselves. There are new characters introduced but the story mainly zeroes in on the complexities of their mission and the characters’ abilities, such as Adam’s connection to Cabeswater and Blue’s role other than being an ‘amplifier’. While all of this was pretty interesting, it definitely did take away attention from the psyches of each character and their psychological nature throughout. The characters and their complexities are my favorite part of this series, and considering I am a generally character-driven reader, pushing through this book was a bit difficult.

Blue Lily, Lily Blue is certainly dirtier and harsher than the other two books when it comes to the hunt for Glendower. Welsh mythology is further delved into and the gang ventures into more dangerous territory, exploring caves, their own abilities, and Maura’s mysterious disappearance. I enjoyed it all honestly, but my liking for it was hindered by the very slow pacing. Parts of it felt as though there was so much yet nothing going on, but I did find the gang’s visits to redneck Virginia and expeditions through cursed caves pretty interesting even if I couldn’t love it fully.

The characters and their psychological development definitely take somewhat of a backseat in this book, compared to the others. Before, even if each book focused on a specific individual, all the characters were incredibly developed. Nothing new about this installment, but I did think the characters and their personalities were a little less vibrant this time around. Blue Lily, Lily Blue obviously looks closer at Blue, and I am quite thankful for that. I’m still not completely on the Blue hype train, but I can somewhat understand her struggle and inner conflict better than before. With that being said, I still felt as though her character didn’t ‘pop out’ as well as Ronan in The Dream Thieves or Gansey and Adam in The Raven Boys. All the characters were a bit underwhelming in this novel, actually.

On a lighter (or heavier) note, things between Gansey and Blue are continuing to heat up and I’m totally on board with this. I love their guilty late night talks and their overall dilemma dealing with Blue’s curse. It’s the perfect amount of angst and it doesn’t feel forced at all. Everyone is crazy for the Ronan and Adam pairing and I am too. I do wish there was more buildup because it does feel like it came out of nowhere, but I’m desperately hoping something happens between them in The Raven King.

Overall, Blue Lily, Lily Blue was a bit underwhelming to me, but I suppose I expected it to be much greater due to my love for the previous installments. I’m so ready for The Raven King to come through and break my heart.

-Haven

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1 thought on “Blue Lily, Lily Blue, by Maggie Stiefvater (Raven Cycle #3) | an underwhelming third installment but still fairly enjoyable”

  1. I’m sorry you didn’t like this book as much as the other two. I agree about Blue, her character didn’t pop out in this one as much as Gansey and Ronan did in their books. I also loved Gansey and Blue’s relationship develop in this book.

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