Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

I’ll Meet You There, by Heather Demetrios

3.5 Stars

If Skylar Evans were a typical Creek View girl, her future would involve a double-wide trailer, a baby on her hip, and the graveyard shift at Taco Bell. But after graduation, the only thing separating Skylar from art school is three months of summer…until Skylar’s mother loses her job, and Skylar realizes her dreams may be slipping out of reach.

Josh had a different escape route: the Marines. But after losing his leg in Afghanistan, he returns home, a shell of the cocksure boy he used to be.

What brings Skylar and Josh together is working at the Paradise—a quirky motel off California’s Highway 99. Despite their differences, their shared isolation turns into an unexpected friendship and, soon, something deeper.

Compelling and ultimately hopeful, this is a powerful examination of love, loss, and resilience.

Today was my first day of school, so I’m glad to blow off some steam with a riveting discussion about books! Particularly I’ll Meet You There, of which I own a copy courtesy of my local library’s summer reading program. I went into this book with very little expectations, but came out of it pleased.

This book is about Skylar, a teenager aching to get out of her small trailer-park town. It’s also about Josh, a teenager back from a stint in the Marines, minus one leg. From the start, these characters were intriguing – they’re colorful and three-dimensional and stay that way throughout the entire book. They had wonderful separate storylines, and Skylar’s opinions and strong personality particularly attracted me (Josh was a douchebag to begin with, but Skylar quickly corrects his more offensive speech patterns.) I loved both these characters individually… but couldn’t really enjoy the forced romantic plot.

I thought the setting of Creek View was beautifully written, and Skylar and Josh fit wonderfully into it – I could feel the effect Creek View had on both of their goals and personalities. I could easily have bought a coming-of-age novel about their individual struggles and their friendship, but thought the romance escalated too quickly and Skylar’s thoughts quickly devolved into typical YA romantic girl mush when she was around him. I did like that they didn’t get together too quickly, but I think the characters were most true to themselves when not thinking about how kissable the other person was.

The side characters, especially Skylar’s friends, were super enjoyable and fun. I would have loved a lot more of Skylar’s interactions and camaraderie with these guys. I also loved how non-stereotypical they were about most everything, and enjoyed the awareness of teenage pregnancy, racism and homophobia.

Although most of the conflict was romantic in nature, other conflicts such as the family/financial struggles of teens living in underprivileged circumstances and PTSD were well written. Although I will forever wonder how teens in YA novels have such complete reign over and access to alcohol and drugs, even these topics were handled with care and an understanding of the gravitas of drug-related decisions.

Overall, this book is a sweet contemporary novel that has well-written characters and settings, but ultimately fails to be extremely memorable due to the forced, cliche romance. It’s a read I definitely still recommend, though!

~Aliza

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Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

Things I Should Have Known, by Claire LaZebnik | a sweet + simple yet important contemporary

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3 3/4 stars 

Things Chloe knew: Her sister, Ivy, was lonely. Ethan was a perfect match. Ethan’s brother, David, was an arrogant jerk.

Things Chloe should have known: Setups are complicated. Ivy can make her own decisions. David may be the only person who really gets Chloe.

Meet Chloe Mitchell, a popular Los Angeles girl who’s decided that her older sister, Ivy, who’s on the autism spectrum, could use a boyfriend. Chloe already has someone in mind: Ethan Fields, a sweet, movie-obsessed boy from Ivy’s special needs class.

Chloe would like to ignore Ethan’s brother, David, but she can’t—Ivy and Ethan aren’t comfortable going out on their own, so Chloe and David have to tag along. Soon Chloe, Ivy, David, and Ethan form a quirky and wholly lovable circle. And as the group bonds over frozen-yogurt dates and movie nights, Chloe is forced to confront her own romantic choices—and the realization that it’s okay to be a different kind of normal.

Things I Should Have Known is a book that I had randomly stumbled upon a few months ago on Goodreads, and while I don’t make it a habit to add books that interest me immediately to my TBR, the reviews for this one were just so great that I had to. Unsurprisingly, while it failed to keep my attention at times, I quite liked its simplicity and sweetness. It weaves a slightly flighty but serious story, with themes of friendship, love, and acceptance.

The writing and overall vibe of the book is essentially a blend of the main topic of autism along with Chloe’s personal life aside from dealing with Ivy and her family. It’s a good blend of seriousness and real-life struggles with being young and figuring yourself out. The mixing of these elements is surprisingly not chaotic, and while I would have done without the typical high school cliches and the unrealistic classroom scenes, the entire atmosphere of the novel is very warm and friendly. Autism is discussed heavily in this book and how society, Chloe, and Ivy herself deal with this condition is conveyed so realistically and unflinchingly. The numerous instances of ableism made me angry, but I appreciated the fact that this was included because it happens in real life, unfortunately. The story didn’t shy away from the truths at all, but still managed to be heartwarming.

The characters are surprisingly realistic and not annoying, and I say this because I’ve seen the “popular girl forms a friendship with outcast guy” trope in many contemporaries, and I was afraid Chloe and David would turn out to be cliched. Thankfully, they were not. Chloe is indeed well-liked and seemingly has a perfect life, but she deals with a lot of unconventional issues for a teen and is just looking for someone to understand her. Her natural personality was quite easy to sink into, which is different because the popular girls (even the protagonists) are usually depicted as closet bitches. David was also a great character, as the story progressed I could definitely see the complexity behind his character growing.

By just reading the synopsis, I think we can all tell Chloe and David are going to fall for each other. Even if I saw it coming a mile away, I absolutely love their relationship. It’s purely based on trust, understanding, and acceptance. No long-ass paragraphs on David’s cheekbones here, people. You can see that they have a true bond, devoid of superficiality.

Things I Should Have Known may not be for everyone, but I would definitely recommend it to those in search of a diverse and honest story that is both important and sweet. I loved the messages this one sent and I’m sure you guys would like it too.

-Haven

Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

Royal Bastards, by Andrew Shvarts | an engaging enough fantasy with an excess of wasted potential

25752041Being a bastard blows. Tilla would know. Her father, Lord Kent of the Western Province, loved her as a child, but cast her aside as soon as he had trueborn children.

At sixteen, Tilla spends her days exploring long-forgotten tunnels beneath the castle with her stablehand half brother, Jax, and her nights drinking with the servants, passing out on Jax’s floor while her castle bedroom collects dust. Tilla secretly longs to sit by her father’s side, resplendent in a sparkling gown, enjoying feasts with the rest of the family. Instead, she sits with the other bastards, like Miles of House Hampstedt, an awkward scholar who’s been in love with Tilla since they were children.

Then, at a feast honoring the visiting princess Lyriana, the royal shocks everyone by choosing to sit at the Bastards’ Table. Before she knows it, Tilla is leading the sheltered princess on a late-night escapade. Along with Jax, Miles, and fellow bastard Zell, a Zitochi warrior from the north, they stumble upon a crime they were never meant to witness.

Rebellion is brewing in the west, and a brutal coup leaves Lyriana’s uncle, the Royal Archmagus, dead—with Lyriana next on the list. The group flees for their lives, relentlessly pursued by murderous mercenaries; their own parents have put a price on their heads to prevent the king and his powerful Royal Mages from discovering their treachery.

The bastards band together, realizing they alone have the power to prevent a civil war that will tear their kingdom apart—if they can warn the king in time. And if they can survive the journey . . 

2 3/4 stars

Royal Bastards was one of my most anticipated reads of 2017, and while I don’t check out new releases almost immediately, I had to make an exception for this one. I loved how mature, chaotic, and fun the synopsis sounded and was pretty sure it was going to be a wild ride. It was a wild ride indeed, but nearly not as interesting as I thought it would be. The writing is very middle grade esque (besides the numerous cuss words thrown around), the world building a tad uninspiring, and the character development — fast. However, I do think it was engaging enough for me to be interested in the second installment, but it could have done so much better if it went a completely different direction.

The writing and pacing of the novel were, to say the least, incredibly unexpected. The prose itself is actually quite simple and modern, something you wouldn’t expect from a medieval fantasy novel, but at the same time there is profuse cussing between the characters. More formal writing is usually up my alley, and I was taken aback with the style, but I did get used to it as the story progressed. I can’t say I loved it, but as someone who is akin to sophisticated prose (think the His Fair Assassin series) in fantasies, the prose in Royal Bastards was strange but also entertaining and very relatable. I am disappointed with the overall maturity level, though. I liked the cussing, and I wanted a more destructive, dark, and at least a little psychological story. The Bastards sounded so fun yet complex in the summary, and I suppose I was expecting the vibe of the book to be darkly comic but still serious. It went a completely separate way, but I guess that’s what I deserve for expecting something so precise anyway.

The characters were equally complex but not complex enough. I understood the basic outlines of their conflicts and personalities, but the motives for their actions were simply not explained enough. They are entertaining, but not as complicated as they should be. Weirdly enough, I expected the most from the characters in this novel because it’s not everyday we read a story through the eyes of royal rejects. I wanted to see their psyche and their conflict concerning their want for belonging yet dislike for the society they’ve been barred from. Tilla does show this, she wants to be loved by her father even if she pretends she doesn’t care, but this complexity was stated so simply and bluntly. I liked Jax and Lyriana, even if they reminded me too closely of other fantasy characters, and Zell was intriguing. On the other hand, I would like to clock Miles in the face.

It seems all negative right now, but there are a few positives. The narration and dialogue were hilarious and relatable. The Bastards are actually somewhat representative of teens nowadays if they were stuck in a fantasy novel. The action and fight scenes were entertaining and there were surprises everywhere, ones that I didn’t see coming. I think I would have liked it so much more if everything was a little bit more bloodier, darker, and Tarantino-esque (I want everything to be Tarantino-esque, don’t ask why), but it was engaging for the most part.

I would recommend Royal Bastards to anyone in search of something different from the usual fantasies imposing on YA right now (I’m looking right at you, Sarah J. Mass). But, if you’re in for a more mature, complicate read, skip this one.

-Haven

Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

Everything Leads To You, by Nina LaCour | wonderfully cinematic + undeniably real

18667779A love letter to the craft and romance of film and fate in front of—and behind—the camera from the award-winning author of Hold Still.
 
A wunderkind young set designer, Emi has already started to find her way in the competitive Hollywood film world.
 
Emi is a film buff and a true romantic, but her real-life relationships are a mess. She has desperately gone back to the same girl too many times to mention. But then a mysterious letter from a silver screen legend leads Emi to Ava. Ava is unlike anyone Emi has ever met. She has a tumultuous, not-so-glamorous past, and lives an unconventional life. She’s enigmatic…. She’s beautiful. And she is about to expand Emi’s understanding of family, acceptance, and true romance.

3 1/2 stars

The only Nina LaCour novel I had read before this one was We Are Okay, which was an emotional and depressing mess, and I was slightly afraid that Everything Leads To You would turn out the same way. Fortunately, it did not! This book was an extravaganza of film, love, acceptance, and even mystery. It was a simple yet elegant story that explored a number of themes, and while it didn’t completely blow me away, I quite enjoyed diving into it.

First off, I loved how thoroughly invested this book was in its Hollywood setting, social atmosphere, and how the overall film industry works. I could feel the overwhelming yet calming nature of the LA atmosphere, as well as the daily thrills and annoyances one experiences while working on a movie set and just being passionate about film in general. I even enjoyed Emi’s angsting about not finding the perfect piece of furniture for the set she’s designing, because the frustration caused by doing everything you can and failing was just as realistic and enjoyable as Emi’s love for movies and all the work she has to do. It was such an engaging atmosphere that charmed me completely with its creativity and richness.

The characters weren’t done as well in my opinion, but I did enjoy their stories. Emi is surprisingly a very vivacious, passionate, and realistic character who goes through a large amount of growth in this book. It’s her overflowing love for what she does that captured me the most, and while I had trouble finding her ‘inner conflict’ as I read, the way she changes as she deals with her numerous responsibilities, matures into an adult, and finally finds true love was wonderfully written. I really liked the recurring theme of Emi discovering the social and economic disparities between her and someone like Ava, and how she learns to acknowledge the fact that she still is young and still learning about the world around her. That aspect isn’t as focused on as her love story with Ava, which is disappointing, but it was still the part I enjoyed the most. Unfortunately, I didn’t find Ava herself to be as interesting and she tended to annoy me often, but she was engaging enough for me to be wrapped up in the mystery of her background.

It’s weird to say that I was more invested in the themes surrounding Ava and Emi’s romance, but it is true. While I liked the pacing of their romance and the tension created between them, Ava and Emi didn’t capture me as much I wanted them to, but I adored how they both learned to separate fantasy from reality, movie sets from real life. Emi’s journey to realizing the imperfection yet greatness of true love and the false realities of a cinematic romance was so effectively written, even if the topic itself is a bit cliche. I thought it tied the plot points of film and finding love perfectly together.

While I would have liked more emphasis on a few plot points and themes throughout the book, Everything Leads To You was a very different, addictive read that I would definitely recommend to those in search of a unique LGBTQ romance with a ton of relatable themes.

-Haven

Books, Reviews, YA Fiction

Hunted, by Megan Spooner | a slow but very unique Beauty and the Beast retelling

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3.25 stars

Beauty knows the Beast’s forest in her bones—and in her blood. Though she grew up with the city’s highest aristocrats, far from her father’s old lodge, she knows that the forest holds secrets and that her father is the only hunter who’s ever come close to discovering them.

So when her father loses his fortune and moves Yeva and her sisters back to the outskirts of town, Yeva is secretly relieved. Out in the wilderness, there’s no pressure to make idle chatter with vapid baronessas…or to submit to marrying a wealthy gentleman. But Yeva’s father’s misfortune may have cost him his mind, and when he goes missing in the woods, Yeva sets her sights on one prey: the creature he’d been obsessively tracking just before his disappearance.

Deaf to her sisters’ protests, Yeva hunts this strange Beast back into his own territory—a cursed valley, a ruined castle, and a world of creatures that Yeva’s only heard about in fairy tales. A world that can bring her ruin or salvation. Who will survive: the Beauty, or the Beast?

Hunted is a refreshing change from the typical fairy tale retellings, specifically Beauty And The Beast retellings, which tend to focus more on the romance. Hunted, on the other hand, is more intent on exploring Yeva’s character and how she connects with the Beast as a human, instead of their combined romantic tension. It’s also largely descriptive and prose-lead, and contains a much darker vibe than the original Beauty And The Beast. It actually differs a lot from the original but in a really necessary way and it does manage to contain the most important elements. Unfortunately, while this book does a number of things wonderfully, its style was just not for me, hence the 3.25 rating. I’m simply not the type of reader that enjoys a slow plot and a gentle build, but I can appreciate all the things Hunted did well.

One of the many elements that separates Hunted from the original/other retellings, is its addition of Russian folklore and culture. The story is set in medieval Russia, and there are are multiple stories traded throughout the book which definitely further that magical vibe that is already there. The snowy setting was largely emphasized as well as Yeva’s skills as a hunter, with descriptions of her frequent excursions into the chilly and dangerous yet peaceful woods. The prose was beautiful, I loved the dark, mysterious, and guarded feel of the story but the vulnerable moments were wonderfully written too.

I’m not the type of reader that enjoys reading slower, more description-based stories, which is exactly what Hunted is. The story can be draggy and dull at times, bogged down by the immense description and lack of enough dialogue to match it. The story’s progression felt very tentative to me, and I had a difficult time investing myself into the mystery behind the Beast and how Yeva fits into it. While there are many intriguing elements added as the plot moves on, I can’t quite say what caused my ‘meh’ feeling for the plot, it just wasn’t my type of story. Which sucks, because it has so much going for it.

The characters though, I was definitely invested in. Yeva came as such a surprise. She’s badass, spirited, and strong but also compassionate and vulnerable. Her love for nature and the woods, as well as her yearning for magic were so expertly expressed, specifically her wanting for something beyond. It’s definitely reminiscent of the original Belle from Beauty and the Beast, but Yeva’s wanting is more entwined with the mystical elements of the story and the nature of her character itself. Contrary to the lone Belle, Yeva actually has two sisters, Lena and Asenka, with who she shares a huge bond. All three sisters are so loving and understanding toward one another while remaining utterly realistic. It’s a refreshing change from the warring and jealous siblings we usually see in fairy tales. B&B’s Gaston is also there in the form of Solmir, who is actually supportive and loving toward Yeva and her sisters instead of being villainous and arrogant like in the original.

Interestingly, the only character I couldn’t come to invest in was the Beast himself. This book did something different by showing the Beast’s perspective too, but it wasn’t enough to make me connect to him. The only time I felt something for the Beast deeply was when Yeva tries to kill him, which was a beautifully written scene altogether.

The ‘romance’ between Yeva and the Beast was very minimal, as it wasn’t the romantic part of their relationship that was emphasized the most. I loved the way Spooner showed how Yeva and the Beast were inevitably bound together, through their mutual love for nature and their yearning for something beyond their reach. I do like how they were never viewed or intended to be romantically involved, but that it was their connection and trust that brought them back to each other. Unfortunately, I still thought the development behind their relationship was a tad rushed and simply ‘not enough’ even if I see the idea behind it. I wanted Yeva to stay with the Beast longer and further explore his psyche, instead of jumping to conclusions and finding out she is right about his past immediately.

Hunted contains many elements that readers will love, but it simply wasn’t my type of book. I’m not that big a fan of fairy-tale retellings anyway, which might explain my indifference toward it to an extent. I do have a strong appreciation for it though, and would definitely recommend to those who like slow plots, descriptive writing, and a more mature vibe from a retelling.

-Haven

Books, New Releases, YA Fiction

Anticipated YA releases: August 2017

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August is most definitely going to be the busiest, most craziest month of summer. I have a multitude of things to take of this month, and school is starting soon (kill me now). And while I probably have to micromanage my reading schedule, there’s no way I will quit reading all together! August seems to collect various genres, from fantasy to contemporary to a combination of both, and I’m pretty hyped.

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Just Friends, by Tiffany Pitcock – Coming August 1st

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A new spin on the classic smart-girl-and-bad-boy setup, this witty contemporary romance shows how easily a friendship – even one built on an elaborate lie – can become so much more.

Jenny meets Chance for the very first time when she is assigned as his partner in their Junior Oral Communications class. But after they rescue a doomed assignment with one clever lie, the whole school is suddenly convinced that Little-Miss-Really-Likes-Having-A’s and the most scandalous heartbreaker in school have been best friends forever. It’s amazing how quickly a lie can grow―especially when you really, really want it to be the truth.

With Jenny, Chance can live the normal life he’s always kind of wanted. And with Chance, Jenny can have the exciting teen experiences that TV shows and movies have always promised. Through it all, they hold on to the fact that they are “just friends.” But that might be the biggest lie of all.

Debut author Tiffany Pitcock delivers a spot-on depiction of first love and the high school rumor mill in Just Friends, chosen by readers like you for Macmillan’s young adult imprint Swoon Reads.

This sounds like a really cute romance that would be perfect to help me get out of a reading slump. These types of novels are my guilty pleasures and I hope this is as adorable as it sounds.Image result for page breaker

Shimmer And Burn, by Mary Taranta – Coming August 8th

32333246To save her sister’s life, Faris must smuggle magic into a plague-ridden neighboring kingdom in this exciting and dangerous start to a brand-new fantasy duology.

Faris grew up fighting to survive in the slums of Brindaigel while caring for her sister, Cadence. But when Cadence is caught trying to flee the kingdom and is sold into slavery, Faris reluctantly agrees to a lucrative scheme to buy her back, inadvertently binding herself to the power-hungry Princess Bryn, who wants to steal her father’s throne.

Now Faris must smuggle stolen magic into neighboring Avinea to incite its prince to alliance—magic that addicts in the war-torn country can sense in her blood and can steal with a touch. She and Bryn turn to a handsome traveling magician, North, who offers protection from Avinea’s many dangers, but he cannot save Faris from Bryn’s cruelty as she leverages Cadence’s freedom to force Faris to do anything—or kill anyone—she asks. Yet Faris is as fierce as Bryn, and even as she finds herself falling for North, she develops schemes of her own.

With the fate of kingdoms at stake, Faris, Bryn, and North maneuver through a dangerous game of magical and political machinations, where lives can be destroyed—or saved—with only a touch.

WOW THIS SOUNDS SO COOL. It seems quite unique with its cast of characters, but also touches upon familiar elements. I’m definitely looking forward to checking it out.

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Little & Lion, by Brandy Colbert – Coming August 8th

25062038A stunning novel on love, loss, identity, and redemption, from Publishers Weekly Flying Start author Brandy Colbert

When Suzette comes home to Los Angeles from her boarding school in New England, she isn’t sure if she’ll ever want to go back. L.A. is where her friends and family are (along with her crush, Emil). And her stepbrother, Lionel, who has been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, needs her emotional support.

But as she settles into her old life, Suzette finds herself falling for someone new…the same girl her brother is in love with. When Lionel’s disorder spirals out of control, Suzette is forced to confront her past mistakes and find a way to help her brother before he hurts himself–or worse.

I love how mental health is being more and more focused on this year, and I’m excited to see what kind of story this book will tell. This sounds like a very different contemporary, and I hope it doesn’t disappoint.

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Wicked Like A Wildfire, by Lana Popović – Coming August 15th

32051720All the women in Iris and Malina’s family have the unique magical ability or “gleam” to manipulate beauty. Iris sees flowers as fractals and turns her kaleidoscope visions into glasswork, while Malina interprets moods as music. But their mother has strict rules to keep their gifts a secret, even in their secluded sea-side town. Iris and Malina are not allowed to share their magic with anyone, and above all, they are forbidden from falling in love. 

But when their mother is mysteriously attacked, the sisters will have to unearth the truth behind the quiet lives their mother has built for them. They will discover a wicked curse that haunts their family line—but will they find that the very magic that bonds them together is destined to tear them apart forever?

First off, can we talk about this cover?! Literally everything is perfect, it’s one the most beautiful things I’ve ever seen. The premise also seems to match the nature of the cover, mystical, magical, and mysterious. Sounds like my type of read 🙂

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Wonder Woman: Warbringer, by Leigh Bardugo – Coming August 29th32336276

She will become one of the world’s greatest heroes: WONDER WOMAN. But first she is Diana, Princess of the Amazons. And her fight is just beginning. . . .

Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law—risking exile—to save a mere mortal. Even worse, Alia Keralis is no ordinary girl and with this single brave act, Diana may have doomed the world.

Alia just wanted to escape her overprotective brother with a semester at sea. She doesn’t know she is being hunted. When a bomb detonates aboard her ship, Alia is rescued by a mysterious girl of extraordinary strength and forced to confront a horrible truth: Alia is a Warbringer—a direct descendant of the infamous Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery.

Together, Diana and Alia will face an army of enemies—mortal and divine—determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. If they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war.

Wonder Woman is getting so much love recently, and who am I to complain? I actually saw the movie about a month ago and it was magnificent, as expected (Gal Gadot is actually flawless). It’s amazing that no one other than Leigh Bardugo herself is taking on this superhero, and I’m sure it’s going to be totally badass.

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What are you guys’ anticipated August releases? Leave me a comment 🙂

Books, Original Post, YA Fiction

Waiting On Wednesday #3 | Leigh Bardugo’s ‘The Language Of Thorns’

Waiting on Wednesday is a meme created by Breaking the Spine where each week we discuss upcoming releases that we’re eagerly anticipating.

Hey guys! This week’s ‘Waiting On Wednesday’ book is The Language Of Thorns: Midnight Tales And Dangerous Magic by Leigh Bardugo! (YEEEEEEEEEE)

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Release Date: September 29, 2017

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

I’m so hyped for this, y’all don’t even know. The Grishaverse is probably my favorite fictional universe ever and I was not prepared to let it go when the Shadow And Bone trilogy and the Six Of Crows duology ended. So ready for the slayage.

What are your guys’ anticipated releases? Let me know in the comments 🙂

-Haven